Bea, your web site is spectacular. I love the colors, the approach, the design, the words.

Nancy

Treasured, threaded moments

Treasured, threaded moments

Arundhati Roy's heart-rending novel captures moments of intense sweetness, all the more precious for their rarity. Here the two children make of them a scant necklace of joy-beads. 'Moments like these, the twins treasured and threaded like precious beads on a...

read more
Love that moves

Love that moves

These closing lines of Dante's Divine Comedy, reached after a long upward journey from the pits to Paradise, leave you floating. And what internal harmony and congruity - your wishes and your will rotating in sync with the same universe-turning wheel. '... but now,...

read more
One last game

One last game

Having given birth to cubs, Tarka's mate goes her own way. But before they part company he calls her to play one last game at the bridge and she joins him there. I liked the timelessness of the otters' game which Williamson suggests has been played since 'before the...

read more
Trust in trust

Trust in trust

Trust is easy when it's there, but hard to generate when it's gone (or never arrived in the first place).  I was curious about Ridley's assertion that a relatively high trust quotient precedes income growth, rather than the other way round. Trust, apart from from...

read more
Perfume of hyssop and thyme

Perfume of hyssop and thyme

A lovely moment remembered by George Herbert and recorded by John Aubrey. Herbert's step-father, Sir John Danvers, had a charming habit of brushing his hat on hyssop and thyme to imbue it with their perfume. As I recently planted hyssop and several additional thyme...

read more
The other reality

The other reality

An intriguing thought, that art is the means to receive hints from another reality.  I am not sure what he means by it, but as I get older, I sense something more numinous.  And I like the idea of art as a kind of antenna - it was Ezra Pound who described poets as the...

read more
Green power

Green power

No, not wind turbines, nor solar panels. This is the green power that raises 'purple spires to the midsummer sky'. Foxglove power or, quoting Dylan Thomas, 'the force that through the green fuse drives the flower'.  I planted a few foxgloves recently and they grew...

read more
A scholar’s garden

A scholar’s garden

Pliny the Younger is a delightful correspondent when he isn't berating you for not having been in touch. His letters have an immediacy and freshness which makes me regret he isn't around for me to write to. Here he ponders how much land is adequate for the scholarly...

read more
What’s the point?

What’s the point?

The eternal question. We can't know what the point is, nor even if there is one.  But in so far as we may need to believe that there is a point to it all, I liked the response given by the writer Philip Pullman: more consciousness, by whatever creative or benign route...

read more
Staying alive, being alive

Staying alive, being alive

I notice more and more things. Recently saw a tiny new wildflower appear on our laissez-faire lawn. A new wild creeping thyme creeping in a new spot. A new pale blue butterfly I've never seen before. A new hedgehog ambling across the garden at the same time as the one...

read more
To the bar and back

To the bar and back

This wonderful anecdote by the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer describes a beloved uncle who would take him to the bar for a drink. Before leaving, he would randomly select three of his eleven dogs to accompany them. This seems to have been perceived as a treat by...

read more
The bees’ feet

The bees’ feet

Two zooming micro-miracles singing the arrival of summer - bees' feet shaking heather bells and the 'sap-stealing dodder' twining around furze spikes.   'When the bees' feet shake the bells of the heather, and the ruddy strings of the sap-stealing dodder are...

read more
The high Greek sky

The high Greek sky

Not the first time I have seen or read of the soaring 'limitless Greek sky'.  It has something vaultingly, deeply, coolingly hyacinthine blue about it, making things seem clean, clear and uncluttered. You can stretch your spirit and limbs lying somewhere staring up at...

read more
A Samaritan at Salisbury

A Samaritan at Salisbury

This account of the 17th century English clergyman and poet, George Herbert, stopping on his way to help a poor man, gives us an insight into his character. His friends asked him why he would sully himself to lend a hand and his answer has the lyricism which imbues...

read more
The nature of wonder

The nature of wonder

This caught my eye, a surprising definition of wonder, presented as 'broken knowledge'. I wondered if that meant 'incomplete' knowledge, the awe that comes of observing without understanding, but the scientist Richard Dawkins has pointed out that understanding the...

read more
A thought on childhood

A thought on childhood

According to his biographer John Drury, the English poet George Herbert 'thought that it was better being a child than an adult', perhaps confirmed by the simple closing line to his poem 'Holy Baptism (II)', comprising three diamond-shaped verses of five lines rhymed...

read more
My kind of civilization

My kind of civilization

You can spend a lot of time thinking about civilization and whether it has a future, but defining it isn't so straightforward.  Or is it? This definition works for me, particularly on a hot summer's day in a piazza in Italy. Or anywhere.Favourite flavours - deepest,...

read more
Pushing the boundaries

Pushing the boundaries

Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal, puts our relatively short-termist parochialism in stark contrast to that of our forebears, who despite multiple constraints of which we are free, were able to conceive and implement long term projects which they wouldn't see...

read more
Happiness is …

Happiness is …

This is a sweeping definition of happiness and particularly touching given it was uttered by a science teacher in Odessa. Pavel Viktor began posting his lectures online so students who missed them could catch up. But his teaching style was so inspiring that he ended...

read more
Play time by the brook

Play time by the brook

One of the delights of observing birds and animals is to see them apparently at play. Williamson's slim, taut and charming classic on otters gives many examples of them playing. Here I liked Tarka's trying to catch and bite a rope of water twist-tumbling out of a...

read more
New, new, new

New, new, new

Something wonderfully simple in these closing lines of Dante's Purgatory, which open up a new and dazzling vista. You know he will next embark on his journey up and into Paradise. The cadence is also of someone confidently stepping out into a new phase of life, with...

read more
Fruit and more

Fruit and more

This line from a George Herbert poem bespeaks a sense of abundance and satiety - the wine is made of grapes, so you don't need them besides.  Herbert collected nearly two thousand aphorisms and they echo in his poetry.   'But can he want the grape, who hath the...

read more
Joyeuse Fête des Muguets

Joyeuse Fête des Muguets

Two things to share today, both lily-related.  I first heard of the 'Fête des muguets' when I was a teenager and was given a bunch of lilies of the valley. Yesterday in Geneva I was happy to see the shops stocked up with slender, small pots and bunches of these...

read more
Living in the moment

Living in the moment

Keats is one of the Great Nuannaarpoqians. He grew up with sorrow, first nursing his mother through tuberculosis and, a few years later, his younger brother, before then succumbing himself. These and other travails did nothing to curb his capacity to grasp moments of...

read more
How to be gentle

How to be gentle

This is a striking comment, that lack of gentleness may stem from having been shocked into fear at some point. How many 'loud and aggressive persons' might have been otherwise had they not been confronted by an enemy of some sort, something propelling them into fear?...

read more
When we think of joyful things

When we think of joyful things

Remember, if you can, a moment when you have been speaking with someone and you land on something about which they are passionate, and you see their face light up and their eyes sparkle. I can think of several such moments, but one which stands out was a couple of...

read more
Blue-bells in spring

Blue-bells in spring

Blue-bells, more even than roses, are the flower I associate with England. There is magic in walking under a woodland canopy among the delicate blue bobbing bells as they carpet the ground for weeks. When I grew up, holidays were spent with my grandmother at her...

read more
Lent lilies and swallows’ time

Lent lilies and swallows’ time

A delicious description of the days of mid-April, when the wild narcissus, known as 'lent lilies', bloom. We've had daffodils and tiny narcissi sunnying the garden for weeks, visited by early-buzzing bees.Williamson's account includes the intriguing mention of house...

read more
To rejoice the heart

To rejoice the heart

A pretty good list of joy-triggers: clear laughter, kind words and tasty dishes. What else? Tell me three more, or one, or two. And what a comment on Zorba, that his return meant the return of all the things that rejoice the heart. There can hardly be a greater...

read more
Because they dreamed of this place

Because they dreamed of this place

I like that Dante's promised land mentions 'human innocence' alongside nectar in everything and spring eternal. Innocence doesn't receive much air time, but to me it could be listed among 'human rights'. When I was growing up it was a put down comment, as if...

read more
Uncharted coexistence

Uncharted coexistence

Don't worry, this isn't about Brexit. Rather, a TED talk by Eileen Crist on 'confronting anthropocentrism' which considers the need to change our engagement with the world if we are to make it to the ever elusive sustainability. However, unlike much of the discourse...

read more
An ageless conversation

An ageless conversation

This distinction between individual and collective dreams comes from the book that inspired nuannaarpoq.com. Both types can fuse into our future, making or breaking it in terms of whether it is bright, liveable or simply bleak. Arctic Dreams probes many of the issues...

read more
Which will you be?

Which will you be?

Essentially, do you cleave to integrity or niftily skirt around obstacles? I liked the choice presented as Achilles or Odysseus, the singular hero or the ingenious man (or woman, this isn't a gender-specific issue).Nicolson's wondrous book poses many questions about...

read more
Across the divide

Across the divide

We play with dogs and cats and some other creatures.  I used to play with a fox in our garden in London: he made a show of taking my abandoned fleece delicately in his mouth and began pulling it off the table where I'd left it, all the while staring at me...

read more
The keen joy of meeting

The keen joy of meeting

Isn't this a marvelous account of a joyous reunion, including the playful pretence of ignoring each other, the better to extend that first thrill of meeting? You will soon perceive, from this and other quotations from the same book, that I've concluded...

read more
How simple and frugal

How simple and frugal

A ringingly simple statement about happiness needing few props in the right place with the right person. A happy moment between Zorba and his friend and occasional boss. Feel free to complete the sentence, 'How simple and frugal a thing is happiness...' with your own...

read more
A spell of peace

A spell of peace

An intricate description of the effect an ancient temple can work on the spirit - a falling away of complication and anxiety and a spilling over of clarity and hope.  I had such a feeling when a handful of us were allowed to roam untrammelled through ruins...

read more
An easy load

An easy load

You've put in the effort and now is the payback, and by the bucket load.  Dante's payback for schlepping through the underworld towards the higher realms was the easy task of returning to where the world is bright. Let me know if you have a place that makes you feel...

read more
Fat with time

Fat with time

If you are busy, perhaps worth scheduling in your packed agenda an hour, morning, day, month or year, in which to be 'fat with time', free of the need to move or do. Or you could propose a regular spot of unscheduled time to your employer, such as Fat With Time...

read more
This land …

This land …

Our relationship to landscapes fascinates me.  Partly it's our reaction to a physical landscape, as when we are bowled over by a view of the sea, rolling hills, desert, meadow or mountains. But it's also the idea of a place and its cultural or personal...

read more
Alive and alone, alone and alive

Alive and alone, alone and alive

Laurie Lee captures a moment of being fully alive and fully alone, during his long, hot walk across Spain in the 1930s at the age of 18. Alone, not lonely.  As you know, you can be happy in solitude, and lonely in company. The book is a wonderful evocation of walking,...

read more
Everything good in this world

Everything good in this world

Zorba lived life to the hilt long before the advent of political correctness.  He wouldn't have had much time for it even if he had lived to see it.But this comment made me laugh, particularly the relegation of chamomile tea to the unpleasant aspects of life. I grew...

read more
Unload your heart of grief

Unload your heart of grief

What a kind, loving, compassionate injunction to Dante. Keep it in mind if you find yourself berating yourself. And if you are experiencing grief, I hope you find the means to unload it soon.  "Much greater faults than yours are washed awayBy much less shame," my...

read more
The tempests of change

The tempests of change

This seems a lesson in authenticity.  Those occasional moments when you say, do or think something and suddenly it rings hollow and tastes metallic, and you wonder who that person is because it isn't you, that much you know. Such disconcerting feelings of...

read more

Or if you'd like to get in touch ...

10 + 2 =

Love nuannaarpoq.com? Enjoy our sister sites:

www.foolsareeverywhere.com    I    www.writingredux.com

Copyright: www.nuannaarpoq.com – Beatrice Otto 2019 – design and content, all rights reserved.  

Colours & fonts chosen for aesthetic strength and because their names reflect the mission of nuannaarpoq.com.  Colours: menu, header & text box: Warm Welcome by Quete80   I   footer: Be Happy by OrendaWhisper.  Fonts: sans serif: Ubuntu   I   script: Spirit of Dance by Vera Holera   I   serif: Lustria

Pin It on Pinterest